Current Affairs Newsview NOVA & TV3

07-11-2001 | Nicole Klement, Jan Velinger

Moving technical equipment from the station's Hradec Kralove studios, photo: CTKMoving technical equipment from the station's Hradec Kralove studios, photo: CTK TV3 licence holder Martin Kindernay confirmed on Tuesday that he had ordered TV3's service organisation to stop broadcasting or face immediate legal action; Mr Kindernay cited "technical reasons" for the cutting off of broadcasting, but the move is evidently part of an ongoing struggle for control of the station, involving Mr Kindernay versus the station's foreign investors.

Mr Kindernaj, the holder of the terrestrial broadcasting licence, got into conflict with TV3 after he transferred the broadcasting licence to his own private company, RTV Galaxie.

On Monday investors, represented by Luxembourg-based company European Media Ventures, moved technical equipment from the station's Hradec Kralove studios to TV3's Prague headquarters, telling the media that the TV3 would continue broadcasting via cable and satellite. So far, the Council for Radio and TV Broadcasting have refused to step in, claiming it is a business dispute.

Political commentator Vaclav Pinkava believes that the ongoing disputes in the commercial media sector stems from insufficient legislation and that investors should therefore expect to have problems. At the same time, Mr Pinkava sees a problem in the fact that many foreign investors have tried to take advantage of the developing market to make a quick profit and engaged themselves in dubious business deals.

"And I really have no particular sympathy with people who, in the interests in making pots of money, make mistakes with the partners they chose, or even the countries they choose to operate in, because those are the risks they have chosen to incur, to get rich later."

TV3 licence holder Martin KindernayTV3 licence holder Martin Kindernay There are suggestions that Martin Kindernay's company is somehow associated with the general director of TV NOVA, Mr Zelezny who himself is in the midst of a complicated legal battle with American media company CME. And observers say the way Kindernay is dealing with his business partners very much resembles Mr. Zelezny's ways. However, developments in the past days, including the arrest of Mr. Zelezny's lawyer, indicate that although slow, justice does work. Furthermore, Mr Pinkava sees the Czech Republic's EU accession as a factor which will substantially improve the business practices within the media sector.

"I think the whole thing is going to stabilise progressively faster and faster, I think the whole thing is a sort of non-linear process, there are enough causes for concern coming through the media, matters are coming to a head, I think really the watershed for me is joining the EU, because a lot of what is going on here is being done frantically while it's still possible to live on the outskirts of Europe, in a kind of quasi-commercial, quasi-democratic society, and the normalisation, to use that horrible word, that will come with being part of this awfully boring thing called the EU, will be for the good of this country, and I think that's when everything will finally sort itself out because a lot of these loopholes in law, and in the way it is applied, will be closed for us by the accepted practices of the European Union and that's why I think it's a very good thing for this country to be in the EU."

Social bookmarking

Featured

Also in this edition

The EU criticises public tender

Nicole Klement

More

Puppet theatre festival to take place in Prague this weekend

Alena Škodová

More

Czech and Slovak priests beatified

Olga Szantová

More

Related articles

More

Section Archive

More

Latest programme in English